OIC concern with India

28

OIC concern with India

OIC concern with India |India concerns the citizenship bill and Babri Masjid case, OIC. The Islamic Cooperation Organization (OIC) has expressed concern over the treatment of Muslim minorities in India, saying that the UN Charter and the principles of other international institutions guarantee the rights of undocumented minorities.
In a statement issued from Jeddah, the OIC said: the OIC’s General Secretary is closely watching recent actions affecting Muslim minorities in India. The statement on the controversial citizenship bill and other measures by the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in India states that both the rights of citizenship and the Babri Masjid case are of recent concern.
In its statement, the OIC emphasized the Indian government, saying “India emphasizes the protection of the Muslim minority, the protection of Islamic holy sites. In the current situation in India, the OIC has stated that “the General Secretariat emphasizes the importance of the UN Charter and other international treaties to guarantee the rights of minorities without discrimination. The OIC cautioned that ‘if any action was taken in contravention of these principles and treaties in this regard, further tensions could escalate and could have dangerous consequences for peace and stability across the region. Protests and protests by Muslims and other organizations have been underway since the parliament passed the bill on citizenship, where at least 23 people have been killed and dozens injured.
Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamed criticized the new law on Indian citizenship at a news conference after the conclusion of the summit in Kuala Lumpur. Mahathir Mohammed had said that India is a secular state and that people should not be prevented from getting citizenship on the basis of religion because this is unfair.

The lower house of India, the Lok Sabha, passed the bill on December 9, 2019, while the upper house, Lok Rajya Sabha, had passed the decree on December 11 and the next day, the Indian president signed the bill, after which the bill became law. Under this law, Indian citizenship is granted to non-Muslim immigrants from all six religions of Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Afghanistan, Hindus, Christians, Parsis, Sikhs, Jains and Buddhists, under this bill amending the Citizenship Act of 1955. Illegal immigrants belonging to selected categories will be eligible for Indian citizenship. The law was opposed by Congress, including all opposition parties and religious parties, as well as the extremist Hindu party Shiv Sena, and said the center was trying to create a division of Muslims and Hindus in the country through this bill.